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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Gransfors Bruks Scandinavian Forest Axe vs. American Felling Axe

    So I have a GB Small Forest Axe, and while it is an AWESOME tool, I often find myself wishing it were slightly bigger. I would like to stay with Gransfors Bruks as I think anything of lesser quality will make me miss the SFA.

    That said, does anyone here have experience with either the Scandinavian Forest Axe or the American Felling Axe? I know the AFA is much bigger, but sometimes you just want to fell a tree, ya know?

    From GB website:

    Quote Originally Posted by Small Forest Axe
    Small Forest Axe
    Same size as the Hunter's Axe but a more traditional pattern and poll. The blade is thin. The handle is long enough to allow powerful chopping but not too long so it will fit into a rucksack, the back of a car or a boat. Practical for splitting small sticks for the fire or cutting small-diameter limbwood for starter fuel in a fireplace.

    The axe has a 3 1/4" face and a 19" hickory handle and the head weighs 1 1/2 lb.
    It comes with a grain-leather sheath.
    Quote Originally Posted by Scandinavian Forest Axe
    Scandinavian Forest Axe
    A more profesional axe for those who want to limb a felled tree in the traditional way. Forged to a thin, curved bit and sharoened to make it suitable for cutting branches in fresh, resinous wood, spruce or pine. The long handle gives extra strength and power to the cut.

    The axe has a 3 1/2" face and a 25" hickory handle and the head weighs 2 lb.
    It comes with a grain-leather sheath.
    Quote Originally Posted by American Felling Axe
    81 cm 2.2 kg
    It won't let me copy/paste that last one. To convert it looks like it's just under 32 inches long and 4.85 pounds.
    If you always do what you've always done, you'll always get what you've always got.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    721
    I'm not help on this but I will add my question if that's alright. So I see that their website states that the Scandinavian axe is meant for working with green woods or softer woods such as pine and spruce. How does the axe hold up to American hardwoods such as oak and hickory, does the fine profile of the blade mean that it dulls more quickly? Thanks

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    New Jersey
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    the american felling axe is 35" long - good for taking down trees and splitting but it's too long to do one-stick fires with say arm-thick wood that you'll need to split then featherstick with the same axe...using your axe this way is still good with the scandinavian but anything bigger than that and it'll start becoming unwieldy.



    the 25" handle of the scandinavian is like the width of a mountain bike's handle bar - perfect size. hold your arms straight in front of you, that's roughly where your hands will be when holding the scandinavian axe from the lanyard hole to just under the head.


    Quote Originally Posted by McCarthy View Post
    I'm not help on this but I will add my question if that's alright. So I see that their website states that the Scandinavian axe is meant for working with green woods or softer woods such as pine and spruce. How does the axe hold up to American hardwoods such as oak and hickory, does the fine profile of the blade mean that it dulls more quickly? Thanks
    we have lots of hardwoods here, it works just fine and holds a great edge.




    the head is narrower than your typical splitting axe found in home depot/lowes but i use a wedge whenever i can anyway to save energy.







    the geometry makes for nice feathersticks...you really can use this as your only tool if need be.

    Last edited by JV3; 01-22-2013 at 03:56 PM.
    nra | beckerhead #33 | rat pack #716
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
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    SW Georgia
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    Quote Originally Posted by McCarthy View Post
    I'm not help on this but I will add my question if that's alright. So I see that their website states that the Scandinavian axe is meant for working with green woods or softer woods such as pine and spruce. How does the axe hold up to American hardwoods such as oak and hickory, does the fine profile of the blade mean that it dulls more quickly? Thanks
    I think the hardwood vs. softwood has to do with the profile of the cheeks and the way they pop loose chunks of wood.

  5. #5
    brandon Guest
    I'm really wanting a good axe. I need to sell a knife though.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    1,129
    As others have said, the Scandinavian is a great axe. I have a 19" wetterlings and, like you it seems small at times. The Scandinavian fills the "one step up slot very well.
    Jim
    RP# 1018

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    MA
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    Thanks for the replies guys. I will see if I can get my hands on a Scandinavian Forest Axe locally before taking the plunge.
    If you always do what you've always done, you'll always get what you've always got.

 

 

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